FAQs - Right to Acquire

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Right to Acquire

  1. Can I buy a different property to the one I live in?

    Under the Right to Acquire you can only purchase the home you currently live in, if it’s eligible. You will not be able to purchase another of our properties.

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  2. Can I buy my home with cash or do I have to have a mortgage?

    It’s up to you how you fund the purchase, whether by cash or mortgage. However, we will ask you to declare how you intend to fund the purchase. Large cash amounts are subject to money laundering regulations and both yours, and our, solicitors will carry out the relevant checks. We would strongly recommend that you seek professional financial advice before going ahead with the purchase.

    You would need to discuss any specific funding issues with your lender directly. For example, if you wanted to use your discount as a deposit for a mortgage or if you can borrow additional money to make improvements to your home.

    If you have rent arrears you can still apply to buy your home. However, you must make any outstanding payments before completion.

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  3. Can I buy the garage I rent from CHP?

    We do not sell individual garages so if you are paying a separate rent for a garage, you will not be able to buy this with your purchase of your home.

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  4. Can I share my Right to Acquire with anyone else?

    You can share the Right to Acquire with up to three family members who have lived with you for at least the past 12 months (even if they don’t share your tenancy). Qualifying family members include a parent, grandparent, child, grandchild, brother, sister, uncle, aunt, nephew or niece.

    If you are sharing your Right to Acquire with a spouse, civil partner or partner they must be living with you, and if your partner is not your spouse or civil partner they must have been living with you for at least 12 months.

    Family members can give you the money to buy your home, but the purchase will be in your name (the tenant) only. Family members who are giving you the money, but do not live with you, will not be included in any of the Right to Acquire documentation. You will also need to be able to prove to your solicitor that the money has come to you legally.

    Please be cautious if someone you do not know contacts you regarding buying your home or offers you money to buy it. They may be trying to persuade you to do something that benefits them rather than you. If this happens we strongly recommend that you seek legal advice.

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  5. How much discount will I get?

    The discount is a fixed amount depending on the local authority area your home is in.  See the GOV.UK website for more information.

    Currently in 2018/19 the maximum discount available is as follows:

    Maximum discount for different districts
    Brentwood and Epping Forest £16,000
    Basildon, Chelmsford, Harlow and Uttlesford £13,500
    Castle Point, Colchester, Maldon and Rochford £11,000
    Braintree and Tendring £10,000
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  6. How much is my home worth?

    We value our homes every year, so we will give you an estimated price that you can use as a rough guide to help you decide if you can afford to buy. If you decide to go ahead with your Right to Acquire application (RTA1) and it is agreed by us, we will then arrange for your property to be valued by an independent valuation company.

    We will ask you what, if any, improvements you have made to your home and pass this information to the valuer who will assess the market value of your home as if the improvements have not taken place.

    We will then write to you with an offer notice stating the current full market value, less the discount you are entitled to, which will be the amount you will have to pay to buy your home.

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  7. Is there any charge for applying for the Right to Acquire?

    We will not charge you for applying for the Right to Acquire. However, you will incur some charges if you decide to go ahead with the purchase, such as solicitors’ fees, surveyors fees, a mortgage fee, stamp duty, and Land Registry fees.

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  8. We have a joint tenancy, but only one of us wants to buy. Will that be okay?

    Yes, provided the tenant not wanting to buy gives their consent on the application form (RTA1). However, we will still need to meet with them before we progress the application.

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  9. What is the difference between freehold and leasehold?

    If you live in a house your home is likely to be a freehold property. This means that you will buy your home and the land, which we will show you on a plan at the offer stage.

    If you live in a flat or maisonette you will be buying your home as a leasehold property, which will usually include any sheds or storage areas that are included in your tenancy. This means that if you buy your home, we will give you a full 125-year lease. We will still own the freehold of your home.

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  10. Why might you deny a Right to Acquire application?

    Your Right to Acquire may be denied if:

    • You have not been an assured tenant for three years;
    • A joint tenant hasn’t given their consent for the other tenant to buy without them;
    • We’re unable to verify your, or other applicant’s, identity;
    • The property isn’t your main home;
    • We do not hold enough interest in the property i.e. a lease for less than 50 years for a flat or less than 35 years for a house;
    • There’s a court order for possession of your home against you or someone at your home;
    • The court has suspended your Right to Acquire because of antisocial behaviour;
    • You are ‘un-discharged bankrupt’;
    • You are being declared bankrupt;
    • You have made a voluntary arrangement with creditors i.e. an individual or company voluntary arrangement;
    • We plan to demolish your home and you’ve been served a Demolition Order.
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Total results: 10